Olympic Games 1928 Amsterdam

9th Olympiad

THE NETHERLANDS

Sports: 19            National Teams: 46

Postage Stamps


8 special postage stamps were published 1928
First Day:   27. March 1928
Engraver: ?
Designer:  F. Mees and L. Wenckebach

 

Value

Color / Discription Stanley
Gibbons No.
Michel No. Edition
       1 1/2  (+1 C) green
Sculler
 363 205 502.570
              2 (+1 C) purple
Fencer
 364 206 428.592
             3  (+1 C) green
Footballer
 365 207 461.657
             5  (+1 C) blue
Yachting
 366 208 526.485
  7 1/2 (+2 1/2 C) orange
Putting the weight
 367 209 545.599
             10(+2 C) red
Marathon runner
 368 210 542.787
           15  (+2 C) blue
Horseman
 369 211 449.856
           30  (+3 C) sepia
Boxer
 370 212 316.186

Valid to:   31.12.1928
 


  OLYMPIC POSTAGE STAMPS 1928

was considered an important item, so the Committee accordingly approached the Postmaster General and the scheme- had his ear. He promised his cooperation, and eight stamps were eventually designed representing, as illustrated,


By selling the stamps at a price higher than their face value there would be a margin of profit, which would go to the Committee. The scheme yielded no less than 50.000 guilders, an amount which surpassed all expectations.


Judging from the receipts during the few months just prior to and immediately after the Games a huge number of stamps must have been bought by the public in a comparatively short time. Many of these probably found their way to collectors abroad.

The Post Office on the Stadium grounds even instituted a separate selling organisation which issued forms with a full set of Olympic postage stamps cancelled with the Stadium stamp, and an explanation in Esperanto. This evidently proved most attractive, for about 9000 of these forms were sold. An illustration shows the form with the special Stadium stamp which was used by the post office officials to cancel letters, etc. posted at the Stadium Post Office.


For the benefit of those who required a fairly large number of the Olympic stamps, but had no wish to wait in the long queues which formed up at the counters in those days, the authorities circulated order forms, on which anyone desirous of purchasing postage stamps could state what was required. The stamps ordered were in due course delivered to the person or firm in question after the necessary terms of payment were or had been complied with. A most valuable means of propaganda, for which the Committee is extremely indebted to the Post Office Authorities, was the cancelling stamp with an announcement of the Olympic Games at Amsterdam. This stamp was used on all mails leaving Amsterdam during the three months, April—June 1928, and  as the letters, postcards, etc. bearing the announcement were automatically  distributed throughout the world it was an important item especially inour foreign propaganda campaign.This cooperation on the part of the Postmaster General  was highly appreciated by the Committee.



The cancelling stamp used as propa-
ganda on postal matter for some
months prior to the Games.

(Source document:   Official Report 1928, page 225)


 
 
Advert:    Heiko Volk, Olympia-Philatelie

 

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Other Olympic Games Stamps:



  • 1896Athens, Greece
  • 1900Paris, France
  • 1904St. Louis, USA
  • 1906Athens, Greece
  • 1908London, England
  • 1912Stockholm, Sweden
  • 1916cancelled
  • 1920Antwerp, Belgium
  • 1924Paris, France
  • 1928Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • 1932Los Angeles, USA
  • 1936Berlin, Germany
  • 1940cancelled
  • 1944cancelled
  • 1948London, England
  • 1952Helsinki, Finland
  • 1956Stockholm, Sweden
  • 1956Melbourne, Australia
  • 1960Rome, Italy
  • 1964Tokyo, Japan
  • 1968Mexico City, Mexico
  • 1972Munich, Germany
  • 1976Montreal, Canada
  • 1980Moscow, Soviet Union
  • 1984Los Angeles, USA
  • 1988Seoul, South Korea
  • 1992Barcelona, Spain
  • 1996Atlanta, USA
  • 2000Sydney, Australia
  • 2004Athens, Greece
  • 2008Beijing, China
  • 2012London, England
  • 2016Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2020Tokyo, Japan